Q&A, Writing Discussion

Keeping Organized During Revisions

I’ve got a lot of friends in the revision trenches these days, and oh boy it isn’t easy keeping an entire novel in your head for months on end. My trick is that I don’t. How do I keep track? WELL FRIENDS, I use a spreadsheet. I know, I know, boring right? But it works! And colour coding… and and…

Anyway, here is a sample Edit Tracking Worksheet that I use for revisions. You might know the story 😉

There are likely as many ways to edit a manuscript as there are writers, but I’ve found this method helpful for me, especially when switching between projects. What chapter did the birthday cake disaster happen in? I can just look it up. The spreadsheet is really just a listing of what happens in each scene, what day it is, and who is there.

I create the editing tracker after the first draft is done, but you can absolutely write it as you go. For each draft, I create a sheet in the Excel file. I keep the records of my old drafts, in case I need to go back and find a scene I cut out of a previous iteration of the book. The first page is always the latest draft.

Column Breakdown:

  • Ch – The chapter
  • Sc – The scene
  • Scene summary – One line or two about what happens in the scene
  • POV – Point of view character. This is only important if you have multiple view points.
  • Notes – Things I have to go back and fix / add / pay attention to in the next draft. I write these notes as I go, and don’t fix previous scenes until I start the next draft (in case my ideas change). You might want to fix them as you write. You do you!
  • Other Characters – Who else shows up in the scene. It helps me keep track of who is introduced when, and so I don’t misplace anyone or that character I killed off reappears unexpectedly (because *cough* it happens).
  • Day – Helps keep track of time. This is especially helpful for plots that have a compressed timeline. I sometimes even note if it’s morning or evening.

Optional Columns:

I use these to diagnose plot problems, and I change these to be anything I’m worried about. You can add whatever questions you like!

  • Goal – Conflict – Resolution – New Goal – Helps me identify what a scene is lacking (a sense of purpose, why it’s happening, or tension).
  • Emotional Beat – Helps me keep track and so that there are a variety of emotions and that I don’t repeat myself.
  • Who made the choices? I sometimes have a problem with character agency. Too many chapters where the main characters are forced to act instead of choosing a course of action can signal a problem.
  • Type of Ending? This one I’m just experimenting with, because I have trouble ending my chapters in the right place. It been helping me figure out if my chapter endings make a reader want to read on. Endings can be either a Promise (Something’s going to happen later), a Twist (Something new just happened), or a Resolution (The villain promised in chapter 1 finally appears). Naturally, promises and twists build up tension, while resolutions allow a reader to take a breath, before you ramp it back up again. A variety is a good thing!

Colour Coding Fun

  • Highlighting new scenes. Any the new scenes added to a draft are highlighted in yellow, so that when I do the next draft I pay closer attention it, because it likely requires more editing than any older chapters which have gone through a couple rounds of edits already.
  • Edited scenes. If I’ve edited a chapter I’ll colour the chapter and scene boxes so that I know it’s done. This is particularly helpful if for some reason I’m not editing chapters in order.
  • Action vs Quiet Scenes. Sometimes I’ll colour code my scenes red for action or blue for quiet, so that I can see the overall pacing of the novel at a glance.

Extra Extra!

You can physically print out the outline and cut it apart row by row to rearrange things until the plot sequence is just right, and figure out where any new scenes might go the next draft. I find that at least for me, I like to see it all laid out at one time. I also use a lot of tape and it ends up looking like some giant magical scroll that might fall apart at any moment. YMMV.

MS Word tip: If you make your chapter and scene breaks headings in Word, and open the Navigation Pane, you can actually drag each section around in the pane if you need to switch things around. No need to copy and paste! The Navigation pane also makes finding Chapters and Scenes in your manuscript really easy if you’re referencing your spreadsheet.

Okay, any questions? How do you organize your revisions or multiple projects at once?

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Journal, Writing Discussion

April 2019

I was at the Creative Ink Festival this past weekend and OH wow I’m exhausted. My voice is a little raw, but I had a great time.

I attended more panels on the business and research side of things this year, and I did speak on two panels: Writing Killer Openings, and Selling Short Stories.

This is my third time attending and speaking at the festival, but I still took a ton of notes amassed a bunch of conference going tips that of course I’ll share…

Something I tried:

Being prepared really helps calm the public speaking nerves. This is the first time I think I actually enjoyed the public speaking. It’s absolutely okay to have a cheat sheet even if you never look at it. The moderator for my first panel emailed us the questions she would ask before hand, which was super helpful because it made us look GOOD (and if you ever moderate a panel in the future, I would recommend doing this). For my second panel, I didn’t receive any questions, but I wrote down everything I could think of based on the panel description, and jotted notes as the other authors on the panel were speaking so I could speak to those points when it was my turn.

A tip I’m definitely going to steal from a co-panelist:

Write down everyone’s names as you sit down, so that you can address the other panelists by name if you have something to add (name cards usually face the audience).

Something to avoid:

This is not a hard and fast rule, but it’s a pet peeve of mine when speakers don’t actually offer any concrete advice when they’re talking about a subject. For example, they might explain a thing, but not how to do a thing. Maybe it’s my teacher training, but I always look for actionable information out of my panels. It’s one thing to say: the opening of a story needs to hook a reader. It’s another thing to say: Here are three things you can do to create an opening that hooks a reader.

Faking extroversion (totally doable): 

Introduce yourself to your fellow panelists before you speak. If you’re sitting in the audience, simply smiling and waving hi to anyone that sits nearby you is usually enough to start a conversation. If you don’t know what to say, it’s perfectly okay to ask “How’s the conference going for you?” or “Have you attended before or is this your first time?” Having some prepared conversation starters is a good tip. I dislike speaking about myself, and so I tend to ask a lot of questions instead of speaking about myself. “What genre do you write?” I choose low pressure things, because we’re almost all introverts.

Books and resources that were recommended over the weekend:

  • Rock Your Plot / Rock Your Revisions by Cathy Yardley
  • Newsletter Ninja by Tammi Labrecque
  • 5 Critical Things For Successful Book Signings by Adam Dreece
  • Cornell University Copyright Chart – Helpful if you want to check whether a work belongs to the public domain
  • The Lock Picking Lawyer & Bosnian Bill on Youtube for practical lock picking information (in case your characters ever need it)
  • Techniques of the Selling Writer by Dwight Swain (or search for “Scene and Sequel” for info on this plotting technique)

And now, I’m going to hide in my cave and not speak to anyone for a few days. 🙂

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