Writing Discussion

Required Reading

Sometimes the most radical thing you can do is just to listen.

Making a Monstress. Interview with Marjorie Liu

If you haven’t read it, read it.

This was one of the best interviews I’d read in a long time. Marjorie finds words the words for so many things I haven’t been able to in my life, because It’s like the air you breathe, it feels just like life until one day you find out that everyone else has been living off of oxygen, not nitrogen, that they don’t see the sky is red not blue.

Personal Essays from POC Destroy SF

There’s a great variety here of writers from different backgrounds. Some are funny, some are inspiring, some leave you feeling heavy. There are many things to think about. POC get lumped together into one big group, but its so diverse there’s always something to learn.

Deadpool gets cancer right

“Survival doesn’t always guarantee happiness”. As someone who’s father had cancer, and whose uncle just had a terminal diagnosis, this resonated. Also got me thinking about how we handle survivors, or disabilities, or illnesses in fiction.

4 Comments

  1. I had seen the Deadpool headline, but hadn’t read the article, so thanks for the nudge.

    I’ve just read a pretty cool YA novel called, “It’s All Your Fault” (great title, no?), and one of the three main characters is a thirteen-year-old girl who’s dying of cancer. She’s a great character, full of energy and lunacy, and when she comes in, around halfway through the book, things _really_ get out of control.

    In a good way. 🙂

    I’m planning a story set in a nursing home (since I was doing a lot of research for a couple of years there) and a character with cancer might fit right in…

    1. I think it’s always good to get the perspective of someone who’s actually experienced something like that. Of course, the range of reactions varies, but I think it’s a good reminder that anger and humor both are very valid ways of dealing.

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